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Effect of protected dietary oils on dry matter intake, nutrient digestibility, and milk production in dairy goats.

E. Vargas-Bello-Pérez

Abstract:

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Effect of protected dietary oils on dry matter intake, nutrient digestibility, and milk production in dairy goats.
E. Vargas-Bello-Pérez*1, R. Ayala-Hernández2, N. Pescador-Salas2, O. Castelán-Ortega2, M. González-Ronquillo2. 1Department of Veterinary and Animal Sciences, Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen Frederiksberg C, Denmark, 2Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria y Zootecnia, Instituto Literario 100, Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México Toluca, Estado de México, México.

This study evaluated the effect of protected dietary oils on dry matter intake (DMI), digestibility and milk production in dairy goats. Nine Saanen goats with 150 d in milk were blocked by live weight (LW; 59 ± 4 kg) and used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design (n = 3) with 25-d periods and were kept in individual pens. Periods consisted of 17 of diet adaptation and 8 d of data collection. A basal diet based on barley hay and corn silage was supplemented with 2.7% DM of calcium soaps of either palm (PO), canola (CO) or safflower (SO) oils. Goats were milked daily at 0700h, and milk yield was recorded daily in all experimental periods. Data for LW, dry matter intake (DMI), nutrient digestibility and milk production was analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Sums of squares from the data were separated into overall mean, goat (within square), square, period, diet, and overall error. All variables were considered fixed, except for goat (within square) and overall error, which were considered random. DMI was higher (P < 0.001) in PO and CO than in SO (113 and 112 vs. 87 g/kg LW0.75). Compared with CO, in vivo digestibilities of dry matter (65.3 ± 2.25 vs. 55.2 ± 2.39 and 58.8 ± 2.32%), organic matter (66.3 ± 2.23 vs. 55.9 ± 2.39 and 60.6 ± 1.90%), and neutral detergent fiber (61.6 ± 2.73 vs. 46.0 ± 6.14 and 51.0 ± 4.27%) were lowered (P < 0.001) by SO and PO. Compared with PO and CO, milk production increased (P < 0.001) by SO (0.88 ± 0.19 and 0.95 ± 0.11 vs. 1.10 ± 0.17 kg/d). Overall, compared with PO and SO, CO promoted a more efficient use of nutrients in dairy goat diets.

Keywords: goat, oils, milk.