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Survey of perceptions and practices of antimicrobial drug use in preweaned California dairy calves.

E. Okello

Events

06-24-2020

Abstract:

408
Survey of perceptions and practices of antimicrobial drug use in preweaned California dairy calves.
E. Okello*1,2, D. Williams1, R. Pereira2, T. Lehenbauer1,2, S. Aly1,2. 1Veterinary Medicine Teaching and Research Center, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis Tulare, CA, 2Department of Population Health and Reproduction, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of California, Davis Davis, CA.

The California dairy industry was surveyed in July 2017 to evaluate producers' knowledge, perceptions and antimicrobial drug (AMD) use in preweaned dairy calves following the implementation of veterinary feed directive (VFD) changes in Jan 2017 and before the CA Senate Bill (SB) 27 effective Jan 2018. These regulations required veterinary oversight of medically important antimicrobial drugs (MIADs) administered to livestock. Questionnaires were mailed to 1,361 CA grade A dairies and calf ranches across CA and 169 (12%) responded. Most respondents (83%) were aware of the VFD and SB 27 changes. Use of antibiotics was perceived as important (77%) in raising preweaned dairy calves and judicious use of antibiotics was ranked as the most important antimicrobial stewardship practice (n = 134) among good record keeping, observing withdrawal periods, having a valid Veterinarian-Client-Patient-Relationship, and use of alternatives to antibiotics. Producers indicated that calves were exposed to AMD either directly through parenteral and oral dosage forms (78%) or indirectly through hospital milk (44%). Treating sick calves was the major indication for AMD use; however, few (12.7%) producers reported use of antibiotics to control or prevent disease (11%). Neomycin sulfate, chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline and sulfamethazine were the most used AMD, though only 32% of the respondents kept a drug inventory. Decreased use of AMD post-VFD was noted in milk (10%) and grain (5%) and reported treatment records included date (82%), dose (44%) and route (15%) of AMD used. Only 13% and 16% respondents noted a decrease or increase in AMD costs respectively. Whereas most producers had knowledge of the VFD and SB 27, opportunities exist to improve AMD use practices, including record keeping and using AMD alternatives. The limited changes noted in AMD use could be due to the short period between the implementation of VFD and the time of the survey. Results of this survey provide a baseline for future evaluation of the impact of these regulatory changes and guide future best practice recommendations to promote judicious use of AMD.

Keywords: antimicrobial drug use, producer perceptions, dairy calf.