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Supplementation with cobalt sources, folic acid, and rumen-protected methionine during late pregnancy in Holstein cows alters whole-blood mRNA abundance after ex vivo lipopolysaccharide challenge in newborn calves.

M. G. Lopes

Events

06-22-2020

Abstract:

78
Supplementation with cobalt sources, folic acid, and rumen-protected methionine during late pregnancy in Holstein cows alters whole-blood mRNA abundance after ex vivo lipopolysaccharide challenge in newborn calves.
M. G. Lopes*1,2, A. S. Alharthi2,3, H. Dai4, V. Lopreiato5, E. Abdel-Hamied6, M. N. Corr�a1, M. T. Socha7, J. J. Loor2. 1NUPEEC (N�cleo de Pesquisa, Ensino e Extens�o em Pecu�ria), Departamento de Cl�nicas Veterin�ria, Programa de P�s-Gradua��o em Biotecnologia, Universidade Federal de Pelotas Pelotas, RS, Brazil, 2Department of Animal Sciences and Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana, IL, 3Department of Animal Production, College of Food and Agriculture Sciences, King Saud University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 4College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University Nanjing, China, 5Department of Animal Sciences, Food and Nutrition, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Science, Universit� Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Piacenza, Italy, 6Animal Medicine Department, Beni-Suef University Beni-Suef, Egypt, 7Zinpro Corporation Eden Prairie, MN.

An adequate supply of nutrients during fetal life is an important determinant of immunocompetence in the neonatal animal. We investigated effects of supplementing multiparous Holstein cows during the last 30-d of pregnancy with an experimental folic acid source (FOA), 2 Cobalt sources [Co glucoheptonate (Copro) or Co pectin (CoPectin), Zinpro Corp.] and rumen-protected Methionine (RPM) on calf whole blood mRNA abundance after ex vivo LPS challenge. Seventy-two cows individually fed a basal diet [1.37 Mcal/kg of DM, 14.5% CP] were randomly assigned (17—19 per diet) to Copro, FOA+Copro, FOA+CoPectin, or FOA+CoPectin+RPM until 30 d postpartum. Cows in each FOA group received 50 g FOA. Co treatments delivered 1 mg Co/kg DM. The RPM was fed at 0.09% of DM to achieve a ratio of 2.8:1 Lys:Met in the MP. Blood samples were collected at birth (before colostrum), 21 and 42 (weaning) d of age and immediately challenged with 3 �g/mL LPS. Target genes evaluated by RT-PCR are associated with immune response, antioxidant function, and 1-carbon metabolism. The statistical model used in SAS 9.4 included treatment, age and their interactions as fixed effects. Preplanned contrasts were FOA vs. no FOA, CoPectin vs. Copro, and RPM vs. no RPM. Abundance of IRAK1 was the sole gene differentially expressed across all contrasts, a response associated with highest abundance in the FOA+CoPectin+RPM group. In addition to IRAK1, calves born from cows supplemented with FOA had greater (P ≤ 0.05) abundance of BPI and GPX1 coupled with lower SELL. Similarly, calves born from cows supplemented with CoPectin had greater (P ≤ 0.01) IRAK1 and lower (P ≤ 0.04) CXCR1, SELL, and MTR. With the exception of IRAK1, MPO, LYZ, and GSS, all genes experienced a decrease (P < 0.001) in abundance over time. Overall, data suggest that greater maternal supply of nutrients associated with 1-carbon metabolism can modulate important pathways associated with immune response to a pathogen challenge in neonatal calves.

Keywords: epigenetics, nutritional programming, vitamin B12.

Biography: PhD student in the Biotechnology Graduate Program at the Federal University of Pelotas, Brazil and Visiting Scholar in the Mammalian NutriPhysioGenomics Laboratory at the University of Illinois, USA