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Influence of cobalt source, folic acid and rumen-protected Methionine supplementation on performance, metabolism, and liver tissue 1-carbon metabolism biomarkers in peripartal Holstein cows.

A. S. Alharthi

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06-23-2020

Abstract:

208
Influence of cobalt source, folic acid and rumen-protected Methionine supplementation on performance, metabolism, and liver tissue 1-carbon metabolism biomarkers in peripartal Holstein cows.
A. S. Alharthi*1,2, V. Lopreiato3, R. Bucktrout1, Y. Liang1, A. A. Elolimy1,4, H. Dai5, I. Martinez-Cortes6, M. T. Socha7, J. J. Loor1. 1Department of Animal Sciences and Division of Nutritional Sciences, University of Illinois Urbana, IL, 2Department of Animal Production, College of Food and Agriculture Sciences, King Saud University Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, 3Department of Animal Sciences, Food and Nutrition Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environmental Science, Universit� Cattolica del Sacro Cuore Piacenza, Italy, 4Department of Animal Production, National Research Centre Dokki, Giza, Egypt, 5College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University Nanjing, PR China, 6Department of Agriculture and Animal Production, University Autonomous Metropolitan Mexico City, Mexico, 7Zinpro Corporation Eden Prairie, MN.

We investigated effects of supplementing an experimental source of Folic acid (FOA; Zinpro Corp.), 2 Co sources [Co glucoheptonate (Copro) or Co pectin (CoPectin), Zinpro Corp.] and rumen-protected methionine (RPM) on performance and metabolism of multiparous Holstein cows from −30 relative to parturition through 30 d of lactation. Multiparous Holstein cows blocked according to the expected calving date, cows within each block were balanced for parity, previous lactation milk yield, and BCS before the close-up. Seventy-two cows (17 to 19 per treatment) were individually fed a basal diet [1.37 Mcal/kg of dry matter (DM), 14.5% crude protein] supplemented with Copro, FOA+Copro, FOA+CoPectin, or FOA+CoPectin+RPM. In each FOA group cows received 50 g FOA. Cobalt treatments delivered 1 ppm Co/kg DM. The RPM was fed at 0.09% of DMI to achieve a ratio of 2.8:1 Lys:Met in the MP. Blood samples and liver tissue were collected at −10, 7, 15, and 30 d relative to parturition. The statistical model used in SAS 9.4 included the random effect of block and fixed effect of treatment, time and interactions. Preplanned contrasts were FOA vs. no FOA, CoPectin vs. Copro, and RPM vs. no RPM. No differences were observed for DMI (13.1 � 0.5 kg/d prepartum, 15.9 � 0.8 kg/d postpartum) or milk yield (40.1 � 1.8 k/d). Cows fed FOA had lower (P = 0.05) milk fat and total solids %; whereas RPM led to greater (P = 0.01) milk protein %. Plasma cholesterol, fatty acids, and bilirubin were lower (P ≤ 0.05) and retinol and tocopherol greater (P ≤ 0.05) in cows fed FOA. In contrast, CoPectin led to lower (P ≤ 0.02) hydroxybutyrate and nitric oxide, and tended to lower (P = 0.06) myeloperoxidase activity and increase antioxidant capacity (FRAP). Among 13 genes in the 1-carbon metabolism pathway measured, abundance of the vitamin B12-dependent enzyme methionine synthase (MTR) was the only one affected, being greater in cows fed CoPectin. Despite similar performance, data revealed alterations in plasma and liver tissue biomarkers when feeding different Co sources with or without FOA and rumen-protected methionine.

Keywords: prepartum, postpartum, vitamin B12.