Adsa Logo White Adsa Title White

Pattern of behavioral, physiological, and performance parameters before and after clinical diagnosis of mastitis.

M. M. Pérez

Events

06-24-2020

Abstract:

389
Pattern of behavioral, physiological, and performance parameters before and after clinical diagnosis of mastitis.
M. M. Pérez*1, E. M. Cabrera1, C. Rial1, D. V. Nydam2, J. O. Giordano1. 1Department of Animal Science, Cornell University Ithaca, NY, 2Department of Population Medicine and Diagnostic Sciences, Cornell University Ithaca, NY.

The objective of this study was to compare the pattern of multiple behavioral, physiological, and performance parameters automatically collected by sensors in cows diagnosed with clinical mastitis (CM). Data from Holstein cows (n = 1,206) evaluated for CM by clinical examination at or after milking for up to 28 DIM were used. Sensor parameters used were: activity (ACT), resting (RET), rumination (RUM) and eating (EAT) behavior, reticulo-rumen temperature (TEMP), milk production (MILK) and milk components (FAT, PROT, LACT), and milk conductivity (CON). Sensor data from d −7 to 7 after CM diagnosis was compared between cows with no evident signs of clinical disease (NCD n = 824), CM only (CMO; n = 52), and CM plus another disorder during the 15-d period (CM+ n = 29). Data were analyzed by ANOVA with repeated measurements with group, time, and their interaction and lactation number (1, 2, or 3+) as fixed effects. Cow within group was a random effect and the subject of repeated measures. Sensor data used for NCD cows was for the 7 d before and after the average DIM at mastitis diagnosis for cows in the CMO and CM+ group. MILK was reduced (P < 0.01) after d −5 for CM+ and after d −2 for CMO compared with NCD, with the greatest difference on d 1 and 2. FAT and FAT-to-PROT ratio values differed (P < 0.01) in the range of d −1 to 2 as they were greater for CMO and CM+ than for NCD. CON was greater (P < 0.01) for CMO and CM+ than for NCD after d −3 and d −2, respectively with the greatest difference in d −1 and 2. RET was greater (P < 0.01) for CMO than NCD after d 0. ACT was lesser (P < 0.01) for CM+ than NCD after d 0. RUM was lesser (P < 0.01) for CMO and CM+ from d −5 to d 5 with the greatest difference on d 0, whereas EAT was lesser (P < 0.01) for CMO and CM+ from d −2 to 7 d with the greatest difference on d 0 and 1. TEMP was greater (P < 0.01) for CM+ than NCD on d −1 and 0. We conclude that cows with CM only and CM plus another disorder presented specific patterns of behavioral, physiological, and performance parameters that can be detected by sensors hence, these pattern changes might be used to predict the occurrence of cases of CM.

Keywords: sensor, mastitis, dairy cow.