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Characterization of a commercial whey protein hydrolysate and its use as a binding agent in whey protein isolate agglomeration process: A preliminary study.

B. Zaitoun

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06-24-2020

Abstract:

364
Characterization of a commercial whey protein hydrolysate and its use as a binding agent in whey protein isolate agglomeration process: A preliminary study.
B. Zaitoun*1, J. Amamcharla1, N. Palmer2. 1Kansas State University Manhattan, KS, 2Glanbia Nutritionals Twin Falls, ID.

Enzymatic hydrolysis is used to improve the functional characteristics of whey proteins. The type and specificity of the enzyme influence the properties of the resultant hydrolysate. In a recent invention, the whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) was utilized as a binder to facilitate the agglomeration of whey protein isolate (WPI). The first objective was to characterize the chemical properties of 3 lots of WPH obtained from a commercial manufacturer. The degree of hydrolysis (DH) of WPH was between 13.82 and 15.35% and not significantly (P > 0.05) different between the lots. From the MALDI-TOF, 10 to 13 and 2 different peptides were observed in the range of 2.5 — 5 and 5 — 8 kDa, respectively. It was also observed from the HPLC that the major whey proteins were completely hydrolyzed indicating a consistent hydrolysis. The second objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of WPH as a binder in wet agglomeration of WPI. For this purpose, a 3 � 3 � 2 factorial design was conducted with pre-wet mass (60, 100, and 140 g), WPH concentration (15, 20, and 25%), and flow rate (11 and 16 rpm) as independent variables. Agglomeration of WPI was carried out in a top-spray fluid bed granulator (Midi-Glatt, Germany). All the experiments were performed in triplicates using 3 lots of WPH. Agglomerated WPI samples were stored at 25�C and analyzed for moisture, water activity, relative dissolution index (RDI), foaming, and emulsifying capacity. There was a significant (P < 0.05) difference in moisture content (range: 3 — 20%) and water activity (range: 0.08 — 0.80) among the agglomerated powders. High moisture content and water activity were observed for the treatments with higher pre-wet volume and higher flow rate and also resulted in clumping of the powders. The treatment that has 60 g of pre-wet, 20% WPH concentration and 16 rpm feeding speed combination had the highest RDI among all the samples. In conclusion, WPH can be used as a potential alternate to soy lecithin in wet agglomeration.

Keywords: agglomeration, whey, hydrolysate.

Biography: My name is Baheeja Zaitoun. I'm a 2nd year master student in Kansas State University. I work under Dr. Jayendra Amamcharla supervision. My research is focused on�the optimization and characterization of dairy-based agglomerated protein products using whey protein hydrolysate as a binding agent.