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Impact of supplementary trace mineral source in the diet of prepartum cows on quality of colostrum and passive transfer of immunity in newborn calves.

L. Ogilvie

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06-22-2020

Abstract:

145
Impact of supplementary trace mineral source in the diet of prepartum cows on quality of colostrum and passive transfer of immunity in newborn calves.
L. Ogilvie*1, B. Mion1, J. F. W. Spricigo1, B. Van Winters1, B. W. McBride1, S. J. LeBlanc2, M. A. Steele1, E. S. Ribeiro1. 1Department of Animal Biosciences, University of Guelph Guelph, ON, Canada, 2Department of Population Medicine, University of Guelph Guelph, ON, Canada.

Our objectives were to evaluate the impact of supplementary trace minerals source, inorganic (ITM; Co, Cu, Mn, Zn sulfates and sodium selenite) or organic (OTM; Co, Cu, Mn, Zn proteinates and Se yeast; Bioplex Sel-Plex, Alltech Inc.), fed to prepartum cows at 100% of recommended levels (0.25, 13.7, 40.0, 22.8, and 0.3 ppm respectively), on quality of colostrum and passive transfer of immunity in newborn calves. Heifers and cows (n = 240) were enrolled at 45 � 3 d before expected calving date, blocked by parity and BCS, and allocated randomly to ITM or OTM. Automatic feeding gates were used to assign treatments to individual cows. Shortly after calving, cows were milked and the volume of harvested colostrum was measured. Percentage Brix was determined by refractometer and concentration of IgG in colostrum was determined by radial immunodiffusion. Newborns were fed 3L of colostrum (%Brix >22) in the first 6h of life, and additional 3L 6h later. Concentration of total protein and IgG in serum was determined 24h after colostrum feeding using refractometry and radial immunodiffusion, respectively. Continuous data were analyzed by ANOVA and binary data were analyzed by logistic regression using the PROC GLIMMIX of SAS. Models included the effects of treatment, parity, season, and their interactions. Analyses of data from 182 cows indicated no differences in harvested volume (SQRT scale: ITM = 2.1 vs. OTM = 2.2 � 0.06 L; P = 0.21), Brix% (ITM = 24.6 vs. OTM = 24.6 � 0.4%; P = 0.94), and IgG concentration (SQRT scale: ITM = 8.6 vs. OTM = 9.0 � 0.2 mg/mL; P = 0.20) in colostrum of ITM and OTM cows. Total secretion of IgG in colostrum (volume*concentration) was greater in OTM than in ITM (SQRT scale: ITM = 17.4 vs. OTM = 19.4 � 0.6 g; P = 0.03). No differences were observed in birth BW (ITM = 42.1 vs. OTM = 42.1 � 0.5 kg; P = 0.62), concentration of total serum protein (ITM = 6.3 vs. OTM = 6.3 � 0.1 g/dL; P = 0.92), and serum IgG (ITM = 30.2 vs. OTM = 31.4 � 1.6 mg/mL; P = 0.59) between calves born to ITM and OTM cows. Our results indicate that replacement of ITM by OTM in the prepartum diet affected the total amount of IgG secreted in colostrum but did not impact the passive transfer of immunity in newborn calves

Keywords: trace minerals, colostrum, immunoglobulin G.

Biography: My name is Lori Ogilvie. I completed a Bachelor's degree in Animal Biology with a minor in Nutrition and Nutraceutical Sciences from the University of Guelph in 2019. I began my Master's in the same year with the University of Guelph's Department of Animal Biosciences focusing on health and immunology in transition cows and their neonatal calves, with a special interest in the association between the two.