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Potential measurement of daily oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide, methane, and heat production using a spot gas sampling technique in cattle.

C. Lee

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06-24-2020

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Abstract:

W85
Potential measurement of daily oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide, methane, and heat production using a spot gas sampling technique in cattle.
C. Lee*1, K. A. Beauchemin2, K. Nichols3, D. L. Morris4, J. Dijkstra3, P. J. Kononoff4, D. Vyas5. 1Department of Animal Sciences, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, The Ohio State University Wooster, OH, 2Lethbridge Research and Development Centre, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada Lethbridge, AB, Canada, 3Animal Nutrition Group, Wageningen University and Research Wageningen, the Netherlands, 4Department of Animal Science, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Lincoln, NE, 5Department of Animal Sciences, University of Florida Gainesville, FL.

Spot measurement from breaths for CO2 and CH4 (e.g., Greefeed system) has been used to estimate daily CO2 and CH4 production. This study was conducted to examine accuracy of daily O2 consumption and CO2, CH4, and heat production estimated using a spot sampling technique. Data from 3 studies where daily O2 consumption and CO2, CH4, and heat production measured using respiratory chambers were used: Study 1, 8 beef heifers (gases measured every 30 min over 3 d); Study 2, 56 Holstein lactating cows (gases measured every 12 min over 3 d); Study 3, 12 Jersey lactating cows (headbox chamber; gases measured every hour for 1 d). Within study, averages of all measurements (ALL) and averages of measurements from 12, 8, 6, and 4 spot samples (i.e., every 2, 3, 4, and 6-h sampling in a 24 h cycle, respectively; FQ12, FQ8, FQ6, and FQ4, respectively) were compared. Within study, PROC MIXED was used to compare variables between ALL and each frequency and examined an interaction of diet by frequency. PROC REG was used to evaluate accuracy of spot sampling within study [i.e., ALL (observed) vs. FQ12, FQ8, FQ6, or FQ4 (predicted)]. No frequency effect was observed for variables except that CO2 was lower (5,411 vs. 5,552 L/d; P < 0.01) for FQ4 compared with ALL and FQ12, FQ8, and FQ6 in Study 2. No interaction of diet by frequency was observed for all variables except that CH4 tended to have an interaction in Study 1 (P = 0.08), i.e., a diet effect (P < 0.01) with ALL, FQ12, and FQ8 but no effect with FQ6 and FQ4. A regression analysis between ALL and FQ showed that intercepts were different from 0 (P < 0.01) and slopes were different from 1 (P < 0.01) for almost all variables. However, most variables for FQ12 and FQ8 had root mean square prediction errors lower than 8% of the mean and concordance correlation coefficients greater than 0.80. In conclusion, spot gas sampling from chambers using 12 or 8 sampling frequencies (2- or 3-h intervals in a 24 h cycle) has potential to accurately estimate daily O2 consumption and CO2, CH4, and heat production in cattle.

Keywords: gaseous exchange, heat production, spot gas sampling.