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Evaluation of Lifeline Protect at arrival and bovine or porcine NutraPro formulated into a traditional milk program under California feeding and housing conditions during the summer season on calf growth, morbidity, and mortality.

M. Fringer

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06-22-2020

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Abstract:

M66
Evaluation of Lifeline Protect at arrival and bovine or porcine NutraPro formulated into a traditional milk program under California feeding and housing conditions during the summer season on calf growth, morbidity, and mortality.
M. Fringer*1, J. M. Campbell2, S. Williamson1, K. S. Thompson1. 1California State University Fresno Fresno, CA, 2APC Inc Ankeny, IA.

Past studies have evaluated spray-dried bovine plasma in calves demonstrating improved growth and survival as well as reduced fecal scores and medical treatments. Minimal research has been performed using Lifeline Protect (colostrum supplement) or bovine/porcine NutraPro (spray-dried plasma) in a California rearing program during the summer in CA. The objective was to evaluate Lifeline Protect (LP) at calf arrival and NutraPro added to the milk program during California summer heat stress and document calf growth, morbidity and mortality. Calves were fed a mixture of whole milk and milk replacer fortified to 14% solids in a step-down milk program so that by day-56 calves were completely weaned off the bottle. Holstein bull calves (n = 90) were sourced from 12 different central valley dairies and transported to Fresno State University campus on June 2019. Calves were randomized to 1 of 3 feeding treatment groups based on their serum total protein level, BW and dairy origin and they were housed in wooden, California style calf hutches. The 3 feeding groups (n = 30/group) were control, porcine NutraPro (NP), and bovine NutraPro (NB). The control group d 1 first feeding was whole milk and milk replacer mix at 14% solids. For both NutraPro groups, LP was used for the first feeding then whole milk mixed with added milk replacer and either 5% NP or 5% NB to 14% finals solids. Electrolytes were given based on an as needed basis to calves that showed dehydration. Daily health and fecal scores were recorded during the AM and PM feeding. No significant differences were noted between porcine or bovine plasma in performance, morbidity, and mortality of calves. No differences were observed in calf survival between all treatments. On d 56, calf BW (75.9, 75.3, and 74.7 kg) was numerically heavier for NB and NP compared with control, respectively. Attitude and fecal scores throughout the 56 d period were reduced (P < 0.05) in calves fed NB or NP compared with control calves.

Keywords: calves, spray-dried plasma, calf health.

Biography: Graduate student at CSU Fresno. While at fresno is assitant coach of the dairy challenge team and the livestock judging team.