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Factors affecting pregnancy associated glycoprotein (PAG) and pregnancy specific protein B (PSPB) profiles in plasma during early pregnancy.

R. C. Doyle

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06-23-2020

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Abstract:

T98
Factors affecting pregnancy associated glycoprotein (PAG) and pregnancy specific protein B (PSPB) profiles in plasma during early pregnancy.
R. C. Doyle*1,2, J. Kenneally1, M. C. Lucy1, S. T. Butler1. 1Teagasc Fermoy, Cork, Ireland, 2University of Missouri Columbia, MO.

The objective was to examine the effect of cow genetic background (GT: elite Holstein-Friesian, national average Holstein-Friesian (NA), Jersey), fertility index (FI; low < €61, medium €61-€99 and high ≥ €100), milk index (MI; low < €26, medium €26-€40 and high ≥ €41), milk yield (MY), feeding treatment (low grass allowance (LGA), control, high concentrate (HC)) and parity (1, 2, 3+) on plasma pregnancy associated glycoprotein (PAG) and pregnancy specific protein B (PSPB) on d 23, 25 and 28 post-insemination (n = 76 cows). A standard curve was generated for both assays using a pooled sample of plasma collected from pregnant cows serially diluted with plasma from non-pregnant cows (100%, 50%, 25%, 12.5%, 6.25% and 0%). Transformed PAG and PSPB concentrations were analyzed using generalized linear mixed models (results presented as back-transformed LS means and 95% CI). An effect of feeding treatment (P = 0.0035) was observed on the PAG fold change from d 23 to 25 post insemination (5.9 [4.9, 6.9], 3.9 [2.7, 5.2] and 3.8 [2.8, 4.7] for LGA, control and HC, respectively). There was greater fold change from d 23 to 25 with increasing parity number (−1.7 [-10.1, 6.7], 6.3 [4.8, 12.3] and 17.4 [8.1, 26.7] for parity 1, 2 and 3+, respectively; P = 0.02) and FI (−1.4 [-9.1, 6.3], 0.53 [-8.3, 9.4] and 22.9 [12.7, 32.9] for low, medium and high FI, respectively; P < 0.0003) on PSPB concentrations. There was lesser fold change from d 25 to d 28 on PSPB concentrations with increasing MI (2.6 [2.0, 3.21], 1.6 [0.5, 2.6] and 1.0 [0.1, 1.9] for low, medium and high MI, respectively; P = 0.01), MY (3.10 [2.0, 4.2], 2.7 [1.8, 3.7], 1.2 [0.3, 2.1] and −0.1 [-1.5, 1.2] for 25th, 50th, 75th and upper quartiles, respectively; P = 0.006)and GT (2.8 [1.7, 3.8], 2.0 [0.74, 3.2] and 0.4 [-0.8, 1.6] for elite, NA and Jersey, respectively; P = 0.03). In conclusion, PAG was affected by feeding treatment and PSBP was affected by parity, FI, MI, MY and GT. Multiple factors affect PAG and PSPB signal variation between d 23 and 28 post-insemination with PSPB appearing to be more sensitive to the parity, genetics and MY of the cow.

Keywords: embryo development, genetic merit.

Biography: I completed a Bachelors of Agricultural Science in University College Dublin in 2016 for which I received a first class honors degree. I am currently a PhD student with the University of Missouri and Teagasc splitting my time between both institutions trying to elucidate the physiological mechanisms that underpin the most important drivers of productivity; milk output and fertility. The PhD I will be carrying out aims to examine the effects of nutrition and genetics on fertility in dairy cows of high and average EBI. I have a background in sheep farming but have been lucky to work with some of the Ireland's top researchers and farmers in the dairy industry. I've always had a huge interest in Agricultural Industry and its importance for our economy. My aim is to further the knowledge on the factors contributing to reproductive performance and improve the productivity and efficiency of the Irish dairy industry.