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Crosslinked gelatin capsules containing fish oil compared to untreated capsules improved milk fat yield when fed or directly placed into the rumen of Holstein cows.

O. M. Peña

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06-23-2020

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Abstract:

T129
Crosslinked gelatin capsules containing fish oil compared to untreated capsules improved milk fat yield when fed or directly placed into the rumen of Holstein cows.
O. M. Peña*1, S. Saunier1, K. Murphy2, G. L. Lascano1, M. J. Aguerre1, T. C. Jenkins1. 1Department of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, Clemson University Clemson, SC, 2Virtus Nutrition LLC Corcoran, CA.

The objective of this study was to determine the effect of fish oil in treated versus untreated gelatin capsules on milk fat yield and to establish if there was any difference between feeding capsules versus their direct placement into the rumen. Four multiparous ruminally-fistulated Holstein cows were randomly assigned to 1 of 4 treatments in a 4 × 4 Latin square design with 21 d periods. Treatments were: 1) no capsules (CON), 2) untreated capsules (UG), 3) treated capsules fed with the TMR (TGF), and 4) treated capsules placed directly into the rumen (TGR). Both, TGF and TGR capsules were treated with alcoholic solutions of flavoring agents followed by drying. Cows were fed twice a day a TMR with 52% forage and 48% concentrate (DM basis), and formulated to contain 16.7% CP, 29.3% NDF, and 26.2% starch and were milked twice daily. Data were analyzed using JMP Pro 12 with the following preplanned orthogonal contrasts: (1) CON vs. (UG + TGF + TGR), (2) UG vs. (TGF + TGR) and (3) TGF vs. TG. Milk yield (49.6 ± 2.49 SEM kg/d) and DMI (28.4 ± 0.49 SEM kg/d) were not affected by experimental treatments. Fat percentage was higher (P < 0.02) for CON compared with UG + TGF + TGR (3.40 vs. 2.86%) and higher (P < 0.07) for treated vs UG capsules (3.00 vs. 2.60%). Milk fat yield was also higher (P < 0.01) for CON vs fish oil capsules (1.71 vs 1.44 kg/d, P < 0.01) but there was not difference between delivery method for treated capsules. Ruminal concentrations of 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 tended (P < 0.20) to be lower for TGF and TGR compared with UG, indicating the treatment process slows ruminal release of fish oil. When capsules were fed, trans-10 fatty acid concentration in milk tended (P < 0.07) to be higher compared with CON (2.52 vs. 1.29%). Feeding fish oil capsules negatively affected milk fat synthesis. However, results from this study suggest that treated capsules provided limited ruminal protection and partially prevented digestion, decreasing the effect on ruminal biohydrogenation.

Keywords: milk fat, omega-3 fatty acid, biohydrogenation.