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Effects of rumen-protected lysine fed to Holstein cows prepartum and the blood amino acids and metabolites profile on their calves.

B. L. Thomas

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06-23-2020

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Abstract:

T112
Effects of rumen-protected lysine fed to Holstein cows prepartum and the blood amino acids and metabolites profile on their calves.
B. L. Thomas*1, A. R. Guadagnin1, L. K. Fehlberg1, Y. Sugimoto2, I. Shinzato2, F. C. Cardoso1. 1University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, IL, 2Ajinomoto Co. Inc Tokyo, Japan.

We aimed to determine the effects on dairy calves when their dams were fed rumen-protected lysine (RPL; AjiPro-L Generation 3, Ajinomoto Heartland Inc., Chicago, IL; 0.54%DM of TMR as top dress) 28 d before calving. Seventy-two Holstein calves; (male, n = 37 and female, n = 35), blocked based on dams blocking criteria, were assigned 2 different dietary treatments based on dams prepartum treatment of RPL supplementation (L) or without (C). At the time of birth (0.5 � 2h after), before colostrum was given, blood samples were collected into separation blood tubes (Becton Dickinson, Rutherford, NJ). Plasma amino acid concentrations were determined by HPLC (Ajinomoto's diagnostic lab, Japan). Fecal score was measured weekly and health status were evaluated daily. Statistical analysis was performed using GLIMMIX and MIXED procedures of SAS. Male calves in C had higher (P = 0.05) medicated events compared with male calves in L. Thus, male calves in C also showed higher (P = 0.03) antibiotic utilization compared with male calves in L. Plasma lysine concentrations were not different for calves in C or L (P = 0.26; 10.09 �mol/dL vs 10.5 �mol/dL respectively). Plasma methionine concentrations were not different (P = 0.95) among treatments (L = 1.194 �mol/dL and C = 1.198 �mol/dL). Male calves tended to have higher (P = 0.10) plasma methionine concentrations (1.24 �mol/dL) than female calves (1.15 �mol/dL). There was an interaction of treatment by sex for plasma glutamic acid concentrations (P = 0.007); where females in C (5.3 �mol/dL) had higher (P = 0.04) concentrations than males in C (3.9 �mol/dL); and males in C tended (P = 0.06) to have lower concentrations than males in L (5.1 �mol/dL). Another interaction of treatment by sex for plasma alanine concentration (P = 0.05); where males in C (0.44 �mol/dL) tended to have lower (P = 0.06) concentrations than males in L (0.71 �mol/dL). In conclusion, feeding cows with RPL prepartum reduced medicated events in their male offspring. Additionally, male calves from cows supplemented with RPL tended to have increased plasma alanine and glutamic acid concentrations than calves from cows not treated with RPL.

Keywords: calf, amino acids, health.