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Assessing fatty acids and starch solubility in corn grain and corn silage using in vitro method.

X. Huang

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06-23-2020

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Abstract:

T120
Assessing fatty acids and starch solubility in corn grain and corn silage using in vitro method.
X. Huang*1, J. de Souza2, R. Ward1. 1Cumberland Valley Analytical Services Waynesboro, PA, 2Perdue AgriBusiness LLC Salisbury, MD.

Fatty acids and starch are important sources of energy in the diet, but they may also interact and change ruminal biohydrogenation intermediates that may affect milk fat synthesis. When fatty acids and starch are released fast, the production of biohydrogenation intermediates linked to milk fat depression may increase since unesterified fatty acids cannot be completely biohydrogenated to stearic acid. The solubility of fatty acid and starch is assumed to be associated with their degradation rates in rumen. The objective of this study was to assess fatty acid and starch solubility in corn grain and corn silage and their potential correlation. Twenty-seven corn grain samples [17 high-moisture corn samples (HMC) and 10 snaplage samples] and 57 corn silage samples (23 BMR samples) were collected and sent to CVAS (Waynesboro, PA) for in vitro fatty acid and starch solubility analysis. The soluble fatty acid in corn grain and corn silage were 25 � 16 and 25 � 14% of total fatty acids respectively. The starch solubility of corn grain and corn silage were 43 � 22 and 62 � 18% of total starch respectively with significant difference between HMC and snaplage (33 � 17% vs 62 � 15%, P < 0.05). The soluble fatty acids proportion was positively correlated with soluble starch proportion (0.84) and soluble dry matter in HMC (0.91) but not in snaplage (0.33 and 0.34). The soluble fatty acids proportion was also positively correlated with soluble starch proportion (0.64) and soluble dry matter in corn silage (0.62) without difference between traditional corn silage and BMR. The fatty acids and starch content are positively correlated in corn silage (0.73) but not correlated in corn grain. Overall, the solubility of fatty acid and starch in corn silage and HMC are similar. The fatty acids solubility was likely associated with starch and dry matter solubility, which indicated that this method may be useful to rank feed ingredients according to the soluble starch and fatty acid levels. Consideration for this correlation present maybe warranted for improving our ability to predict ruminal fermentation and biohydrogenation under different diets.

Keywords: fatty acids, starch, solubility.